Trains, Bustles, Etc

Trains, Bustles, Skirts & Hemlines.
Hem Length Back

Skirt

Trains
Floor
Handkerchief Hem
Intermission
Midi
Mini
Street
Tea
Bustle
Butterfly
Ballerina
Bouffant
Circular
Flared
Full
Mermaid
Slim
Tiered
Trumpet
Brush
Cathedral
Chapel
Court
Detached/Detachable
Royal
Sweep
Watteau

 

Bouffant   Brush or Sweep Train   Bustle   Butterfly
     

The fullest skirt available. It makes your waist look very small. The bouffant is especially effective in Tulle or Duchesse.

 

Shortest train. It just sweeps or brushes the floor. Very effective on a slim fitting gown.

 

Very common in Victorian and Edwardian times, bustles are a pulling up and fastening of fabric at the back of a dress where the bodice meets the skirt. Many wedding gowns' trains may be bustled, pulled up, so they are out of the way at the reception. See also, French Bustle.

 

At the back, large bow (hence, "butt bow") or fabric flowers where the bodice meets the skirt. Often the bustle is formed just below.

Cathedral Train   Chapel Train  

Circular Skirt

 

Detached/Detachable Train

         

Most typical train, it extends about 2 and half yards (about 7.5 feet) from the waistline.

 

Train which extends about one and a third yards (about 4 feet) from the waistline.

 

The hem on this skirt forms a circle and is not gathered at the waist.

 

Train of any length, which, instead of needing to be bustled, is removed by a series or snaps or buttons.

Flared Skirt

  Floor Length   French Bustle  

Full Skirt

       

 

A skirt which gradually gets larger from the waist to the floor.

 

A Floor length gowns allows the tips of your shoes to show. It may or may not have a train.

 

Very common in Victorian and Edwardian times, bustles are a pulling up and fastening of fabric at the back of a dress where the bodice meets the skirt. Many wedding gowns' trains may be bustled, pulled up, so they are out of the way at the reception. A French Bustle is hooked from underneath, so that the bustled fabric lays on the outside. See also, Bustle.

See also Underbustle

 

 

As the name implies, this is a full skirt gathered at the waist. It is fuller than a Circular Skirt but less full than a Bouffant.

Handkerchief Hem

  Intermission Length or Midi Length   Mermaid or Trumpet Skirt   Mini
       

A tea length skirt made of panels which end in points at the hem.

 

Also known as Midi Length, this skirt falls between the knee and mid-calf.

 

Also known as a Trumpet Skirt, this skirt is fitted at the hips and thighs then flares out from the knees. It may or may not have a train. It can be tricky to kneel or sit in this style.

 

This skirt ends above the knee. Some designs include detachable overskirts which may be removed for the reception.

Monarch or Royal Train   Ruffles   Sheath   Slim Skirt
     

Train that falls 3 yards (9 feet) or more from the waistline. Think Princess Diana. Also called a Royal Train.

 

Tiers of ruffles, usually of organza or chiffon, applied to the skirt, train or back of dress.

 

A close fitting gown. It can be difficult to kneel or sit in this style.

 

A skirt style which fits closely to the body without hugging. It should gently slide against the body, unlike the sheath which actually fits the figure closely.

Street Length

 

Tea Length

  Tiered Skirt  

Train

           

Skirt length falls just below the knee.

 

A skirt ending mid-calf.

 

A skirt with layers of different length skirt fabrics layered upon each other.

 

A length of fabric usually attached at the waistline in back or part of the skirt which extends from the back of the gown. Train lengths include: Brush or Sweep, Chapel, Cathedral, Court, Cathedral or Watteau. Trains may be of the same fabric as the skirt or contrast. They may be Detachable.

Watteau            
           

A train which extends from the shoulders. They are typically only attached and may be tricky to bustle.