Fabrics & Lace

Fabric

Brocade
Charmeuse
Chiffon
Crepe
Damask
Duchesse Satin

 

Dupioni
Faille
Gazar
Georgette
Jersey
Matelassé

  Net
Organdy
Organza
Peau de Soie
Satin
Shantung
Silk
 

Silk Faced Satin
Taffeta
Tulle
Twill
Velvet

 

 

 

 

Lace
Alençon
Appliqué
Battenburg
  Chantilly Lace
Dotted Swiss
  Guipure
Ribbon Lace
Schiffli
 

Soutache
Venise

 More Info on Lace: EHow.


 

Alençon   Battenburg  

Bengaline

 

Bias Cut

         
The most often seen lace on bridal apparel. A net lace with swags and flowers which are re-embroidered on their edges with a very thin cord. It is available with or without sequins or beads. The edges are often left with small threads sticking out  

Lace made by forming loops of linen and connecting them with threads. Patterns may be floral or geometric circles and ovals. It is also used on tablecloths, linens, towels, and doilies. It is usually only available in white or ivory.

 

This fabric has a ribbed look. It may be woven from silk, cotton, polyester or rayon. Also called Faille.

 

If you look closely at most fabrics, you can see they are woven on a grid pattern (the warp and weft). Fabric is usually cut straight across these vertical or horizontal lines. A cut is made on the bias when it is made at a diagonal to the warp and weft. Typically, fabric cut on the bias moves and drapes very well.

 

Brocade   Damask   Jacquard   Caviar Beading
         
Brocade  A heavy fabric woven to achieve a tone on tone pattern. Often the pattern is a floral or ribbon design. A lighter weight alternative to brocade is damask. This is sometimes referred to as Jacquard   Damask A fabric woven to achieve a tone on tone effect. Patterns are often floral. It is lighter weight than brocade. Sometimes referred to as Jacquard  

Jacquard A loom which makes it possible to control each warp thread so that each and every warp end can be raised or lowered at will to form an intricate design. Originally controlled by a punched card system sometimes called the first computer, today the loom is fed by computer generated information that eliminates the cards, making design changes faster and more efficient. Sometimes referred to as Brocade or Damask

  A method of adding small beads to fabric. Remember when you were little and would make a design in glue then sprinkle glitter on it? That's pretty similar
Chantilly Lace   Charmeuse   Chiffon  

Crepe

           
Lace made of fine net with embroidery of flowers, ribbons, scallops often edged in a very thin cord   Essentially lightweight satin. It is often a blend of silk or rayon. It is very soft against your skin   A sheer fabric, chiffon is very light weight and fluid. It is often used in a color layered over a heavier fabric. It also used as a background for embroidery, appliqué or beading   Very thin, light weight fabric with a slightly uneven surface. The surface is a little like the surface of an orange only finer. Crepe is typically made in silk or polyester

Crepe de Chine

 

Crushed Velvet

 

Dart

 

Dotted Swiss

             
French for "Crepe from China." Unlike standard crepe, this is made of silk and tiny bumps or irregularities   A velvet which actual looks like the nap has been crushed in varying degrees. It gives a shimmering effect which can be quite elegant and modern   A dart creates a curve in the fabric and allows the fabric to conform to the shape of the body. The darts in a garment are what make the garment fit. The adjustment of darts for varied shapes is crucial to proper garment construction. The most common places for darts are in the bust and buttock areas   A lace created on a chiffon or fine net with very small circles (dots) of flocking. It is typically layered over another, heavier fabric or may be used in veils

Duchesse Satin or Silk Faced Satin

 

Dupioni

 

English Net

  Eyelet
           
Also known as Silk Faced Satin. This satin has a soft luster. It may be 100% silk or a polyester blend   Typically 100% silk, this fabric is woven will fibers of varying thickness. It has a slubbed or rough finish with a slight sheen. It does have a tendency to wrinkle. Technically, it is a silk yarn reeled from double cocoons or two adjacent cocoons in which silk is intertwined. Shantung is a similar, lighter weight fabric   A fine soft netting with one or two way stretch commonly used in bodices, sleeves and train insets. Should not be confused with tulle  

Either a fabric or lace of light weight cotton with holes "poked" in it. The holes are finished at the edges with thread. Other small floral patterns may be embroidered in the same thread across the fabric.

Faille  

Gazar

 

Georgette

  Guipure
           

This fabric has a ribbed look. It may be woven from silk, cotton, polyester or rayon. Also called Bengaline.

 

Similar to organza, gazar is a sheer, stiff fabric.

 

Similar to Crepe, but without the sheen

 

A lace with large repeating designs, usually circular, with geometric or floral centers, connected by threads. Essentially, a very heavy Venise lace.

 

Illusion or Net   Lyon Lace  

Matelassé

 

Moiré or Taffeta

         

1.)A semi-sheer net-type fabric, Illusion is often used for skirts and in some veils. It may also be called Net or Tulle.

2.) Any style neckline which is covered with chiffon or netting.

  Similar to Alençon, but lighter weight with a thinner cord, giving a more delicate appearance  

A pattern is woven into the fabric, giving it something of a quilted appearance.

 

Moiré  A taffeta fabric with a watermark (wood grain) pattern woven into it.

Taffeta A stiff, medium weight fabric usually made of polyester or a blend. It is widely used in bridal gowns, bridesmaid dresses and prom gowns. It is easily recognized by the crisp, swishing sound it makes as you move. It has a medium sheen. See also, Moiré.

 

Organdy

 

Organza

 

Peau de Soie

 

Rayon

             

A semi-sheer, stiff fabric made of cotton.

 

Very similar to chiffon, but heavier.

 

French for "skin of silk." As the name suggests, this is a silk fabric. It is actually a heavy, dull satin

  When silk was in short supply during W.W.II, the military developed rayon as a substitute for parachutes! Typically it is blended with other fibers, such as polyester
Ribbon Lace or Soutache  

Satin

  Schiffli  

Seam Allowance

         
A lace formed by sewing ribbon in a pattern over a fine net background. Also called Soutache   The most popular fabric weave for wedding gowns. It is typically woven from polyester or silk. It is noted for having a very dull side and a shiny side. There are also matte satins available  

Very light weight lace on a net background with an all over embroidered design, which may be floral, geometric or random. All over, intricate, intertwining, decorative pattern embroidered onto the surface of English net or tulle giving a light, airy appearance, usually with a border.

 

The area of fabric that is between the seam stitching and the cut edge. This would be relevant to the maximum amount a seam can be let out

 

Shantung

 

Silk

  Tulle  

Twill

           
A fabric woven usually of silk, shantung has a nubby, flawed looking texture, very similar to Dupioni, although it is a much lighter fabric. It is also available in polyester   The most popular fabric for wedding gowns. It has a beautiful hand (feel), is soft and has a beautiful luster. It is produced by silkworms, primarily in China. Weave types for silk include Dupioni, Duchesse, Peau de Soie  

A semi-sheer net-type fabric, Tulle is often used for skirts and in some veils. It may also be called Net or Illusion. A fine netting of tiny hexagonal mesh. Commonly used for wedding veils and skirts of gowns. Should not be used in bodices and fitted sleeves as it tears easily and will not give with the body. Use instead English netting.

 

Similar to Faille. It is a fabric with diagonal woven pattern.

 

Velvet

  Venise or Venice Lace        
           

A widely used fabric in apparel and homes. It has a short cut pile to it. Velvet has a thick, soft nap, hence the term "feels like velvet." It is available in silk and other fibers. See also, Crushed Velvet

 

A lace with varying thickness of thread to create floral, geometric and floral designs. An embroidery-style heavy lace not attached to net or any other background. Each motif is attached to the next by thread. May be cut into motifs/appliqués or used all over. May be cotton or rayon (rayon gives a shiny appearance).